Ancient Roman, Greece, Greek history, history and travel, Homer, In the footsteps of the Ceasers, Italy, Mount Vesuvius, Myths and Legends, Roman History, Sites to see in the world, Sorrento, Still Current, The Odyssey, Travel, Uncategorized, What to see in Rome

The Sorrento Coast, Italy: the song of the Sirens

 

Ron Current

Ron Current

Leaving the ancient ruins of Pompeii we journeyed down the northern side of the rugged peninsula that frames the south side of the Bay of Naples to the beautiful town of Sorrento. Our hotel was just north of the town on the water, where across the bay Mount Vesuvius commanded our view.
Sorrento is part of what is commonly known as the Sorrento Coast, the region near the tip of the peninsula that is dominated by high and sheer cliffs that plunge down into the blue Mediterranean. It, along with its sister region the Amalfi Coast on the opposite side of the peninsular, are famous destinations for those seeking fantastic panoramic views and a mild climate.

Vesuvius seen from Sorrento

Vesuvius as seen from Sorrento

 

So exotic and enchanting is this coastal area that it’s said to be the site of an legendary place in one of the oldest works of Western literature, Homer’s the Odyssey.
The Odyssey is the Greek poet Homer’s sequel to his the Iliad  about the Trojan War. The Odyssey tells of the Greek King of Ithaca Odysseus’ (Ulysses in Roman) ten year quest to get home after the war. One of his trials was an encounter with the beautiful and hypnotic Sirens, whose songs would cause sailors to run their ships onto the rocks. It is believed that it was the Greeks who colonized the Sorrento region that attached the area to Odyssey’s sirens.
After the Greeks came the Romans who would make these shores one of their favorite playgrounds. Still today it continues the have the reputation as being an exclusive resort area, not only for the Italians but all of Europe as well. Sorrento 4
Besides the town of Sorrento the area is dotted with small hamlets that stretch along the coast and into the surrounding hills. The Sorrento region is noted for its fresh seafood, olives, grapes, oranges, and lemons; it’s from these lemons that they make their famed liqueur, Limoncello. Shops offer free tasting, and when I sampled one the fumes burned the inside of my nose by just bringing the glass to my mouth. In other words it’s a little too potent for me.
The actively on the streets of Sorrento doesn’t slow down with the setting Sun. The buildings are lighted and music fills the still crowded streets. Even with the scores of tourists and locals you never feel closed in. The crowds move freely from shop to shop, and restaurant to restaurant.

Plaza in Sorrento

The Plaza at the center of Sorrento

If Sorrento is where you’re staying during your visit there’s easy transportation to other points of interest along the peninsula and the bay: Naples and Pompeii are a quick train ride away, buses can carry you other picturesque villages along the Sorrento and Amalfi Coasts, and a ferry can whisk you away to the romantic Isle of Capri, our next destination.

Street in Sorrento at night

Sorrento in the evening 

Sorrento, and its coastal area, may be the most idyllic place to visit with its seaside splendor, mild climate, colorful villages, great food, friendly people, and the most amazing and gorgeous rugged cliff lined shores. In Homer’s story Odyssus had himself tied to his ships mast and his crew’s ears plugged to avoid the siren’s song, but perhaps in reality it was the overwhelming and the awesome beauty of the cliffs that caused the ancient sailor to venture to close and crashed on its rocks.

 
Next: The Isle of Capri, resort of the Caesars.

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One thought on “The Sorrento Coast, Italy: the song of the Sirens

  1. Pingback: The Sorrento Coast, Italy: the song of the Sirens | Still Current

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